The Case for Enrolling, Not Selling

When you decide to bring people into your Idea — like a partner or accountability buddy — we suggest you enroll them into, rather than sell them onto, your journey. When enrolling someone, you create space for them to contribute their unique insights and opinions. It’s an invitation to become a part of something. Selling, on the other hand, is more like the exchange of a commodity.

Here’s an example of the difference:

Selling: You should become a Studio/E member – it will make you a better leader! Want to join?

(Notice the use of the words “should” and “make you”).

Enrolling: At Studio/E, we are inviting diverse and talented leaders like you to explore, launch, and navigate with new entrepreneurial tools and grow a community of people who can positively impact our changing world. You’d be an amazing addition to this crew. Is this something you’d be interested in?

(Notice the use of the words “leaders like you” and “amazing addition”).

Can you feel the difference?

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Extra Credit: Think back to a time you got someone on board with something, like proposing a new Idea to your manager. Now that you understand the difference between enrolling and selling, which do you think you did? Did you invite them to be a part of something and leave space for their insights (enrolling)? Or did you persuade them to get on board with your fully fleshed-out Idea (selling)? Was your approach effective? What would have been more effective if not?

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